The privilege of boredom: Philosophy in isolation – The TLS

Philosophy essay - The TLS | How philosophy can happen in isolation, an essay by Anil Gomes "Those of us at home with children at the moment cannot avoid the “irrelevant intrusion of domestic matters into intellectual life”. A conversation with a colleague about some nicety of Kant was interrupted by my daughter screaming “That’s [...]

Pandemic Recovery Requires Post-Normal Science | Issues in Science and Technology

In world-historical terms we also see periodic collapse and regeneration. A half-millennium of European economic and cultural expansion came to its end with the Great War. Its American extension has been brief, and the twin crises of the Great Recession of 2007–2008 and the coronavirus have now left the US heartland financially debilitated. The initial [...]

Roberto Calasso – Wikipedia

Roberto Calasso (born 30 May 1941 in Florence) is an Italian writer and publisher. Apart from his mother tongue, Calasso is fluent in French, English, Spanish, German, Latin and ancient Greek. He has also studied Sanskrit. He has been called "a literary institution of one". The fundamental thematic concept of his oeuvre is the relationship [...]

A Writer Pursues His Subjects as a Hunter Stalks His Prey – The New York Times

Calasso is especially good at describing the characters of myth and legend with a novelist’s omniscient authority — and the occasional zinger. “For 16 generations Zeus had intercourse with women from earth,” he writes, and “had always been attracted to the women of the house of Argus.” (Even the king of the gods, it seems, [...]

Iris Murdoch: The Art of Fiction No. 117 – Paris Review

Murdoch and her husband live in a house in academic north Oxford. In its comfortably untidy rooms books overflow the shelves and are piled high on the floor. Even the bathroom is filled with volumes on language, including Dutch and Esperanto grammar books. Her paper-strewn second-floor study is decorated with oriental rugs and with paintings [...]

Fast Science and the Philosophy of Science (guest post by Jacob Stegenga) – Daily Nous

“So much science having so much impact, yet philosophers of science have been relatively quiet…” The following is a guest post* by Jacob Stegenga, reader in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge, sharing his and other philosophers’ thoughts on “the role philosophy of science should play during the sort [...]

If history was more like science, would it predict the future? | Aeon Essays

... it is not at all clear that creating a science of history is actually a good thing. But what’s certainly dangerous is letting one particular perspective on what it means to study something scientifically take centre-stage in debating the issue. The methodological reflections of field scientists on how to do science outside the laboratory, [...]

Will brains or algorithms rule the kingdom of science? | Aeon Essays

A schism is emerging in the scientific enterprise. On the one side is the human mind, the source of every story, theory and explanation that our species holds dear. On the other stand the machines, whose algorithms possess astonishing predictive power but whose inner workings remain radically opaque to human observers. As we humans strive [...]

Picnicking on the floor by Timothy Jacobson | The New Criterion

As Chesterton saw it, home is not a place where one could ever conceivably be stuck, as millions lament their predicament today. Rather, one might want to stay there longer. Of course, certain basic conditions apply: Is a particular home capacious or stifling, filled with love or abusive? Assuming even the most favorable fundamentals, however, [...]