NEW : Geopolitics Podcast

Geopolitics Podcast: the Age of Paradox Episode 1 When future historians look back at our age they might think of it as the Age of Paradox. On the one hand we have the pandemic which has slowed down the pace of individual life. On the other we are seeing massive accelerations in politics, economics and [...]

Harvard Cosmologist Cora Dvorkin Dreams in Dark Matter | Quanta Magazine

Lambda-CDM explains very well the observations at large scales. We have tested this theory with different observables — with the cosmic microwave background, with galaxy clustering, with the Lyman-alpha forest. And all of them are in agreement with what is predicted by the Lambda-CDM standard model for cosmology. By construction, different models of dark matter [...]

Philosophy of Humor (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

The hypothesis that laughter evolved as a play signal is appealing in several ways. Unlike the Superiority and Incongruity Theories, it explains the link between humor and the facial expression, body language, and sound of laughter. It also explains why laughter is overwhelmingly a social experience, as those theories do not. According to one estimate, [...]

The Neurology of Flow States – Issue 91: The Amazing Brain – Nautilus

During what psychologists call “flow states,” where one is completely immersed and absorbed in a mental or physical act, people often report an altered sense of time, place, and self. It’s a transportive and pleasurable experience that people seek to achieve, and that neuroscience is now seeking to understand. A great example of flow state [...]

Jules Verne’s Most Famous Books Were Part of a 54-Volume Masterpiece, Featuring 4,000 Illustrations: See Them Online | Open Culture

Not many readers of the 21st century seek out the work of popular writers of the 19th century, but when they do, they often seek out the work of Jules Verne. Journey to the Center of the Earth, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Around the World in Eighty Days: fair to say that we [...]

Women in Science & Engineering on Nautilus: How I Rewired My Brain to Become Fluent in Math

As I discovered, having a basic, deep-seated fluency in math and science—not just an “understanding,” is critical. It opens doors for many of life’s most intriguing jobs. Looking back, I realize that I didn’t have to just blindly follow my initial inclinations and passions. The “fluency” part of me that loved literature and language was [...]

Cosmos on Nautilus: The Crisis of the Multiverse

If the universe, like a box of gas, can exist in only a finite number of available states, theory predicts that we are Boltzmann brains, which conflicts with observations, not to mention common sense. If, on the contrary, the universe has an infinite number of available states, then our usual statistical techniques are not predictive, [...]

Joy Harjo on the Power of Poetry, and on Building a Comprehensive Canon of Indigenous Poems – Chicago Review of Books

“It is poetry that holds the songs of becoming, of change, of dreaming, and it is poetry we turn to when we travel those places of transformation, like birth, coming of age, marriage, accomplishments, and death. We sing our children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren: our human experience in time, into and through existence.” So begins the anthology [...]