Population dynamics and the rise of empires in Inner Asia: Genome-wide analysis spanning 6,000 years in the eastern Eurasian Steppe gives insights to the formation of Mongolia’s empires — ScienceDaily

"Our study of ancient Mongolia reveals not only early genetic contributions from populations on the Western Steppe, but also a marked genetic shift towards eastern Eurasian ancestry during the Mongol Empire. The region has a remarkably dynamic genetic history, and ancient DNA is beginning to reveal the complexity of population events that have shaped the [...]

Hermaphroditus and Salmacis | History Today

The Holy Roman Emperor, Rudolf II, moved the Habsburg court from Vienna to Prague in 1583. Thanks to his patronage, the Bohemian capital attracted many of the greatest talents of their time: the astronomers Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler; the botanist Charles de l’Ecluse; the poet Elizabeth Jane Weston; and a host of artists. Prague [...]

Edith Wharton’s Moroccan Clichés | History Today

Some reviewers disagreed with her and In Morocco prompted political debate. ‘All the properties of an Arabian Nights tale are here’, wrote Irita Van Doren in the Nation, noting ‘camels and donkeys, white-draped riders, palmetto deserts, camel’s hair tents, and veiled women’. However, she cautioned, Wharton ‘accepts without question the general theory of imperialism’. Wharton [...]

How Sultan Selim’s Ottoman Empire Shaped the Modern World | Literary Hub

The coronavirus pandemic is dramatically disrupting not only our daily lives but society itself. This show features conversations with some of the world’s leading thinkers and writers about the deeper economic, political, and technological consequences of the pandemic. It’s our new daily podcast trying to make longterm sense out of the chaos of today’s global [...]

Before the flood by Carolyn Stewart | The New Criterion

Today, feluccas and motorboats bob in the waters of Egypt’s Abu Qir Bay near Alexandria. A mere twenty-two feet below the water’s surface, the ancient cities of Canopus and Thonis-Heracleion have lain silent for millennia. At this exact location two thousand years earlier, boatmen sailed by massive temples and a towering pink-granite colossus. The smiling [...]

The Day After: Navigating a Post-Pandemic World – Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Navigating the post-pandemic international landscape will pose an enormous challenge for decisionmakers in boardrooms and situation rooms alike. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace has convened its global network of more than 150 scholars from twenty countries and six global centers to produce “The Day After: Navigating a Post-Pandemic World”—a digital magazine that provides grounded, [...]

Revisiting Thucydides: Ruminations on the Future of U.S. Indo-Pacific Strategy in an Age of Great Power Competition

While war between the United States and China is a possibility, a larger and more refined lesson could be gleaned from Thucydides’ ancient text. In an era of great power competition, The Peloponnesian War provides one of the first nearly complete histories of a conflict that included complex alliances, ideologically opposing views, civil discord, diplomacy, [...]

ANE TODAY – 202009 – Max von Oppenheim and His Tell Halaf –

Among his most sensational finds were several monumental stone sculptures and relief slabs dating from the early first millennium BCE. They originated from the period when Tell Halaf was the site of Guzana, the capital of a Late Hittite-Aramaean kingdom. The first settlers arrived at Tell Halaf in the Late Neolithic (8000 years ago). When [...]

Christiane-Marie Abu Sarah: How do daily habits lead to political violence? | TED Talk

What drives someone to commit politically motivated violence? The unsettling answer lies in daily habits. Behavioral historian Christiane-Marie Abu Sarah shares startling insights into how seemingly mundane choices can breed polarization that lead to extreme, even deadly, actions -- and explains how to identify and bypass these behaviors in order to rediscover common ground. — [...]

Writing Self, Writing Empire by Rajeev Kinra – Paperback – University of California Press

Writing Self, Writing Empire examines the life, career, and writings of the Mughal state secretary, or munshi, Chandar Bhan “Brahman” (d. c.1670), one of the great Indo-Persian poets and prose stylists of early modern South Asia.  Chandar Bhan’s life spanned the reigns of four different emperors, Akbar (1556-1605), Jahangir (1605-1627), Shah Jahan (1628-1658), and Aurangzeb [...]