The Great Elmore Leonard Renaissance of the Late ’90s | CrimeReads

During his reign as the preeminent king of American crime lit, the late Elmore Leonard was often described as “the most cinematic novelist in the English language.” It was a designation he seemed to encourage, once remarking “I’ve always seen my books as movies.” To be fair, the cinematic track record of Leonard adaptations is [...]

Iris Murdoch: The Art of Fiction No. 117 – Paris Review

Murdoch and her husband live in a house in academic north Oxford. In its comfortably untidy rooms books overflow the shelves and are piled high on the floor. Even the bathroom is filled with volumes on language, including Dutch and Esperanto grammar books. Her paper-strewn second-floor study is decorated with oriental rugs and with paintings [...]

On the City of Florence’s Struggle to Get Back Dante’s Body | Literary Hub

Giovanni Boccaccio’s call for Florence to retrieve Dante’s corpse appears in retrospect to have been primarily an elaborate literary conceit. The city’s abusive treatment and subsequent unworthiness of Dante enabled Boccaccio to fulfill the principal aim of his biography—notably titled a “treatise in praise of Dante”—by casting the poet and his work as “divine.” Later [...]

“Beating the Bounds” | JSTOR Daily

Maps are only one way of knowing the shape of a place. Before the borders of England’s parishes were definitively mapped, people learned the boundaries of their community by foot. Every year, a few days before the feast of the Ascension, the members of each parish would come together to walk the edge of their [...]

Ukrainian Railroad Ladies – The Washington Post

When asked about his inspiration for “Ukrainian Railroad Ladies,” a series of portraits of women who work as traffic controllers and safety officers, photographer Sasha Maslov said, “As a photographer I was drawn to the architecture and interiors of these buildings. As a storyteller I was attracted by the anthropological and social roles played by [...]

The Perils of Antoinette | by Hilary Mantel | The New York Review of Books

In Sofia Coppola’s film Marie Antoinette—as in Stephen Frears’s The Queen, about Elizabeth II—there are repeated scenes in which a rumpled royal person wakes up, dazed, and—yawning and rearranging herself—passes from the unreality of dreams to the unreality of a waking life as a queen. Coppola’s film has a beautiful sleepwalker at its center, and [...]

The page’s the thing – take it from Shakespeare’s earliest readers | Stage | The Guardian

When we watch King Lear, he suggested, we see merely the mundanely pitiful “old man tottering about the stage with a walking-stick”, but when “we read it, we see not Lear but we are Lear”. Deep engagement with the plays meant private study, not public spectacle. — Read on http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2020/apr/01/reading-shakespeare-book-plays-emma-smith

Live with Carnegie Hall | Carnegie Hall

Music has the undeniable power to comfort, uplift, connect, and inspire. In response to this unprecedented time, we invite you to join us for an entirely new original online series: Live with Carnegie Hall. Tune in for unforgettable episodes that feature some of the world’s finest artists as they share behind-the-scenes stories, excerpts from past [...]

Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo | The Procession of the Trojan Horse into Troy | NG3319 | National Gallery, London

The Building of the Trojan Horse and The Procession of the Trojan Horse are part of a series illustrating the fall of Troy, an ancient city on the coast of Turkey that was besieged by Greek armies for ten years. The Trojan War was one of the most important events in Greek mythology. According to [...]