Digital Archives Give You Free Access to Thousands of Historical Children’s Books | Open Culture

Digital Archives Give You Free Access to Thousands of Historical Children's Books | Open Culture — Read on http://www.openculture.com/2020/03/digital-archives-give-you-free-access-thousands-of-historical-childrens-books.html

Hermaphroditus and Salmacis | History Today

The Holy Roman Emperor, Rudolf II, moved the Habsburg court from Vienna to Prague in 1583. Thanks to his patronage, the Bohemian capital attracted many of the greatest talents of their time: the astronomers Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler; the botanist Charles de l’Ecluse; the poet Elizabeth Jane Weston; and a host of artists. Prague [...]

Edith Wharton’s Moroccan Clichés | History Today

Some reviewers disagreed with her and In Morocco prompted political debate. ‘All the properties of an Arabian Nights tale are here’, wrote Irita Van Doren in the Nation, noting ‘camels and donkeys, white-draped riders, palmetto deserts, camel’s hair tents, and veiled women’. However, she cautioned, Wharton ‘accepts without question the general theory of imperialism’. Wharton [...]

How Sultan Selim’s Ottoman Empire Shaped the Modern World | Literary Hub

The coronavirus pandemic is dramatically disrupting not only our daily lives but society itself. This show features conversations with some of the world’s leading thinkers and writers about the deeper economic, political, and technological consequences of the pandemic. It’s our new daily podcast trying to make longterm sense out of the chaos of today’s global [...]

The Philosopher and the Detectives: Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Enduring Passion for Hardboiled Fiction | CrimeReads

The scene is London; the year, 1941. Ludwig Wittgenstein, likely the greatest philosopher of the twentieth century, has taken a hiatus from his Cambridge professorship to do “war work” in a menial position at Guy’s Hospital. By the time he arrives there, in September, the worst of the Blitz is over, but there’s no way [...]

Revisiting Thucydides: Ruminations on the Future of U.S. Indo-Pacific Strategy in an Age of Great Power Competition

While war between the United States and China is a possibility, a larger and more refined lesson could be gleaned from Thucydides’ ancient text. In an era of great power competition, The Peloponnesian War provides one of the first nearly complete histories of a conflict that included complex alliances, ideologically opposing views, civil discord, diplomacy, [...]

Writing Self, Writing Empire by Rajeev Kinra – Paperback – University of California Press

Writing Self, Writing Empire examines the life, career, and writings of the Mughal state secretary, or munshi, Chandar Bhan “Brahman” (d. c.1670), one of the great Indo-Persian poets and prose stylists of early modern South Asia.  Chandar Bhan’s life spanned the reigns of four different emperors, Akbar (1556-1605), Jahangir (1605-1627), Shah Jahan (1628-1658), and Aurangzeb [...]

A cultural history of theatre in antiquity – Bryn Mawr Classical Review

The cultural history of theatre in Antiquity (meaning Greek and Roman civilisations) is the first volume of a collection of six books that explores the cultural history of theatre from a chronological (since Antiquity) and thematic point of view (each volume contains the same ten chapter headings). The focus of this work is not on [...]