Before the flood by Carolyn Stewart | The New Criterion

Today, feluccas and motorboats bob in the waters of Egypt’s Abu Qir Bay near Alexandria. A mere twenty-two feet below the water’s surface, the ancient cities of Canopus and Thonis-Heracleion have lain silent for millennia. At this exact location two thousand years earlier, boatmen sailed by massive temples and a towering pink-granite colossus. The smiling [...]

ANE TODAY – 202009 – Max von Oppenheim and His Tell Halaf –

Among his most sensational finds were several monumental stone sculptures and relief slabs dating from the early first millennium BCE. They originated from the period when Tell Halaf was the site of Guzana, the capital of a Late Hittite-Aramaean kingdom. The first settlers arrived at Tell Halaf in the Late Neolithic (8000 years ago). When [...]

Age of Gilgamesh (3000 BC to 2500 BC) : Geopolitics of Ancient Mesopotamia

https://www.youtube.com/embed/z8rMp_AeR5M Age of Gilgamesh In this presentation we will begin exploring the beginnings of recorded history in Mesopotamia, beginning from the early third millennium BC. We will explore the lives of some great heroic kings of Sumeria, as they led Sumeria from a region of small city states to the first empires which dominated the [...]

Exhibition of underwater cultural relics underway in northwest China – CGTN

The sunken merchant ship, 20 meters in length and 6 meters in width, was built during the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279). It was discovered in 1996 in the waters off Xisha Islands in the South China Sea. Many fragments of porcelain and pottery have been collected and recovered, providing more information about the Marine Silk [...]

Millennia-Old Rock Art in Israel Offers Window Into Lost Culture | Smart News | Smithsonian Magazine

Archaeologists in northern Israel have discovered 4,000-year-old rock art engraved on the walls of three stone burial monuments, or dolmens, reports Ruth Schuster for Haaretz. An analysis of the rock carvings, which depict animals, geometric shapes and what may be a human face, was published last month in the journal Asian Archaeology. — Read on [...]

Archaeologists Discover Enormous Ring of Ancient Pits Near Stonehenge | Smart News | Smithsonian Magazine

Stonehenge is arguably the most well-known megalith in the United Kingdom. But the structures surrounding this roughly 5,000-year-old monument boast equally fascinating histories. Take, for instance, Durrington Walls, a large Neolithic hedge located just under two miles northeast of its more famous neighbor. Though prehistoric humans likely used Stonehenge as a sacred place for ceremonies [...]

Angkor Wat’s Collapse From Climate Change Has Lessons for Today

ANGKOR, CAMBODIANext to the road leading into Angkor Thom—one of the walled cities that make up Angkor, the ancient Khmer empire in Cambodia—stands a solitary but crumbling bridge with corbeled arches made out of recycled sandstone blocks. The bridge seems to be of little significance; no water runs beneath it. Few, if any, of the [...]

Divers Find 16th-Century Shipwreck Off Coast of Northern Italy | Smart News | Smithsonian Magazine

Two professional divers exploring the waters off the coast of northern Italy have discovered the wreck of a large wooden ship thought to date to the 16th century, reports Vincenzo Bruno for Italian news site Notizie. Investigation of the find is ongoing, but a statement from the Archaeology Superintendency of Italy’s Ministry for Cultural Heritage [...]

Rise and Fall of the Indus Valley Civilisation: a perspective

    The Indus Valley Civilisation lasted from the late fifth to the second millennium BC, developed a vast network of well planned settlements and engaged in long distance trade with Egypt and Mesopotamia. The civilisation was referred to as Meluhha in Mesopotamian sources - a name which still exists in India for many fertile [...]