MacArthur’s Grand Delusion | Vanity Fair

In 1950, General Douglas MacArthur was hell-bent on chasing the retreating North Koreans to the Chinese border. Nothing would stop him—not orders from Washington, not intelligence reports that Mao's troops were building up in the area. Which is how hundreds of Americans got slaughtered at Unsan, one of the worst defeats of the Korean War. … Continue reading MacArthur’s Grand Delusion | Vanity Fair

America and the New Spheres of Influence

China and Russia have carved out new spheres of influence for themselves; like it or not, the United States will need to adjust to this reality. ... Cold War history should serve as a reminder: a nation that is simultaneously idealistic and realistic will always struggle to reconcile rationales and rationalizations of purpose, on the … Continue reading America and the New Spheres of Influence

The Application of International Law to Cyberspace: Sovereignty and Non-intervention

The term “cyber attack” sounds dramatic, invoking images of war. Many commentators have talked about how the law on the use of force and the law of armed conflict apply to cyber attacks. But the reality is that cyber incursions by one State into another State’s territory are both more frequent and less dramatic than … Continue reading The Application of International Law to Cyberspace: Sovereignty and Non-intervention

Sieges, the Law and Protecting Civilians | Chatham House

Siege warfare has been employed throughout the ages and remains dramatically relevant today. Questions of the compatibility of this practice with international humanitarian law (IHL) arise when besieged areas contain civilians as well as enemy forces. This briefing addresses those rules of IHL that are particularly relevant to sieges.  — Read on http://www.chathamhouse.org/publication/sieges-law-and-protecting-civilians

Online Disinformation and Political Discourse: Applying a Human Rights Framework | Chatham House

Although some digital platforms now have an impact on more people’s lives than does any one state authority, the international community has been slow to hold to account these platforms’ activities by reference to human rights law. This paper examines how human rights frameworks should guide digital technology. — Read on http://www.chathamhouse.org/publication/online-disinformation-and-political-discourse-applying-human-rights-framework

Security and Prosperity in Asia | Chatham House

At a time of geopolitical uncertainty and with multilateralism under pressure, this conference brought together diverse actors to explore the evolving role of international law on critical security and economic issues in the Asia-Pacific. From trade agreements to deep-sea mining, cyberwarfare to territorial disputes, the breadth of the discussion illustrated the growing reach of international law … Continue reading Security and Prosperity in Asia | Chatham House

Democratize Trade Policymaking to Better Protect Human Rights | Chatham House

... as well as developing ideas for more robust substantive provisions on human rights, policymakers should consider the institutional arrangements required – whether pursuant to the trade agreement or by complementary processes – to ensure that human rights-related risks identified during the planning stages are properly and proactively followed up, that emerging risks are tackled … Continue reading Democratize Trade Policymaking to Better Protect Human Rights | Chatham House

Russia’s Shift To China, From Farmlands To Geopolitics – Worldcrunch

The geopolitical course of the Russian Federation has been debated for decades, but the gravitational forces towards Asia are now obvious for all to see — if you just bother to go look. For more than 15 years, stories circulated about some Chinese businessmen or another taking over a farm in the Russian Far East, … Continue reading Russia’s Shift To China, From Farmlands To Geopolitics – Worldcrunch

Beijing Needs Democracy to Thrive

The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is apparently so confident in its ability to deliver economic growth and the nation’s “great rejuvenation” that it has dispensed with the search for democratic legitimacy. The United States, having observed recent political developments in China, seems happy enough to follow the CCP in writing off the country’s democratic prospects. … Continue reading Beijing Needs Democracy to Thrive