China’s Guided Memory – SWP

In 2019, China commemorated several anniversaries of politically significant events in its recent history: the May Fourth Movement (100 years), the foundation of the People’s Republic of China (70 years), the Tibet Uprising (60 years), the beginning of the reform and opening policy (40 years), and the massacre on Tiananmen Square (30 years). How China … Continue reading China’s Guided Memory – SWP

The Perils of “Survivorship Bias” – Scientific American

An aspiring entrepreneur could be forgiven for thinking that dropping out of college to start a company is the key to success. After all, it worked beautifully for Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg. These business moguls’ well-known stories give the impression that to become a triumph in business, all you need is a … Continue reading The Perils of “Survivorship Bias” – Scientific American

The Man Without Talent – New York Review Books

Yoshiharu Tsuge is one of the most celebrated and influential comics artists, but his work has been almost entirely unavailable to English-speaking audiences. The Man Without Talent, his first book to be translated into English, is an unforgiving self-portrait of frustration. Swearing off cartooning as a profession, Tsuge takes on a series of unconventional jobs—used-camera … Continue reading The Man Without Talent – New York Review Books

From Big Bang to cosmic bounce: an astronomical journey through space and time

Brian Greene’s Until the End of Time sits within a tradition of grand, synoptic visions of the Universe, rooted in physics, that feels (to this British reader) distinctively American. Halfway through, I realized why. With its scepticism of religion but openness to humanistic wonder, awe of nature, celebration of the individual and recognition of the … Continue reading From Big Bang to cosmic bounce: an astronomical journey through space and time

An interview with authors of Lost Maps of the Caliphs: A meticulous book about an extraordinary Fatimid manuscript illustrating the heavens and the earth as was known in 11th century Cairo « Simerg – Insights from Around the World

An enlightening interview with authors of "Lost Maps of the Caliphs," a book about an amazing Fatimid manuscript that maps the heavens and the earth. The manuscript surfaced in the year 2000, and was acquired by Oxford's Bodleian Library. — Read on simerg.com/2020/01/26/an-insightful-interview-with-authors-of-lost-maps-of-the-caliphs-a-work-on-an-amazing-fatimid-treatise-which-provides-a-view-of-the-heavens-and-the-earth-as-was-known-in-11th-century-cair/

The Light of Asia: Western encounters with Buddhism – Asian and African studies blog

Although there was widespread knowledge in medieval Europe of the legend of Barlaam and Josaphat, about an extraordinary prince in India who renounced the world, direct encounters of Europeans with Buddhism only took place from the thirteenth century onwards. Accounts of merchants, explorers and missionaries like those of the Franciscan friar Willem van Ruysbroeck (c. … Continue reading The Light of Asia: Western encounters with Buddhism – Asian and African studies blog